PhD students currently enrolled

Thomas Chan

Ching Hung Chen

Title of thesis
Interactional metadiscourse and citation use in rhetorical moves: A cross-paradigm comparative study of literature reviews in published research articles (Provisional)

Short abstract of thesis
Using a cross-paradigm approach, Thomas' current study aims to examine how interactional metadiscourse and citations are used in different sections (i.e., rhetorical moves) of literature reviews in published research articles following three epistemological paradigms. It is expected that the study can offer insights into how paradigms influence the two linguistic features in research writing.

Name of Supervisor
Dr Becky Kwan

Jason Edward Collins

Jason Edward Collins

Title of thesis
From “Fair Use” to “Should Use": 
Toward a New Transtextual Poetics of the Novel

Short abstract of thesis
Jason Edward Collins’s book-length research project, From “Fair Use” to “Should Use": Toward a New Transtextual Poetics of the Novel, considers the diachronic and synchronic nature of influence in English-language novels, particularly dealing with modernist, postmodernist, and contemporary works of fiction at the intersection of law, culture, and criticism. 

Collins’s project aims to problematize current notions of authorship, originality, and legality in relation to contemporary fictional production. His primary research questions are: What has constituted and what now constitutes the fair use of another writer's ideas, themes, structures, and/or language? What has been and is now considered acceptable use? And what, ultimately, should be used now and going forward to make the novel novel, again, thus ensuring its competitive status with contemporaneous forms of cultural media? 

Collins posits that contemporary writers of fiction (literary fiction, genre fiction, popular fiction, fan fiction, et al) should continue to indulge themselves in the intertextual practices recently adopted by writers of all stripes; more importantly, contemporary writers should embrace a new transtextual poetics of the novel (founded upon homage, collage, and remixing) for their works to (1) standout from those of their peers and (2) survive alongside and compete with other cultural practices and artefacts.

Name of Supervisor
Dr Eric Sandberg

Ffion Davies

Ffion Davies

Title of thesis
Reconceptualising the homme fatal in Early Twentieth-Century American Crime Fiction

Short abstract of thesis
This project will trace the appearance and development of the homme fatal – or, the archetype of the dangerous man – in early twentieth-century American crime fiction. By investigating the ways in which this archetype acts as a signifier of deviant masculinities, we can trace the resulting phenomena whereby the homme fatal undergoes a process of queering in its codification of changing conceptions around masculinity and maleness. The research will be based on, and contribute to, three main research fields: crime fiction studies (particularly of the noir and hard-boiled subgenres, though the theories will apply to a broader view of the genre), Queer studies, and the study of masculinities. This project will fill a significant research gap, for the figure of the homme fatal has not received adequate scholarly attention despite its vital bearing on, and powerful reflection of, changing conceptions of masculinity within early twentieth-century American culture.

Name of Supervisor
Dr Eric Sandberg

Alice Feng

Alice Feng

Title of thesis
CLIL (Content and Language Integrated Learning) Applications in Hong Kong secondary schools: Reading and Writing Connections in Humanity and Arts Subjects 

Short abstract of thesis
Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL), a dual-focus teaching approach, has been implemented for almost a decade in Hong Kong. In CLIL teaching, reading and writing are two inalienable language competencies that teachers should teach secondary students in order to develop critical thinking and help them to succeed at university levels. This project aims to examine the effectiveness of implementing reading and writing pedagogical tasks along with Humanity and Arts subject in Hong Kong secondary schools. The project will employ a mixed-method approach, requiring qualitative and quantitative data collection. The quantitative method will involve comparative statistics between pre-and post-tests, whereas the qualitative method will include semi-structured interviews from both student and teachers’ perceptions.

Name of Supervisor
Professor Diane Pecorari

Sunny Huang

Sunny Huang

Title of thesis
The Perceptions of Engagement Practices in Clinical Communication: A Case Study of Nursing College Students in Mainland China

Short abstract of thesis
Qing's proposed thesis aims to explore college nursing students' perceptions of engagement practices in clinical communication in an ESP course in Mainland China. She investigates nursing students’ perceptions of engagement in nursing communication, identifies features of the spoken language and communication skills in their current engagement practice(s) by video-recording their role-play communication, and develops related teaching pedagogy that is intended to inform ESP pedagogy on engagement in Mainland China. .

Name of Supervisor
Dr Jack Pun

Xian Jin

Xina Jin

Title of thesis
Development of undergraduates’ incidental vocabulary learning in academic reading context: An experimental study at an English medium university in Hong Kong (Tentative)

Short abstract of thesis
Students’ skills in second language (L2) use strongly depend on the number of vocabularies they know. In the context of incidental learning, it is assumed that L2 learners learn unfamiliar words through contextual exposures and clues, through which they fully engage in the process of decoding the meaning of novice words, and eventually merge those words into their own lexicon. In spite of its potential benefits in terms of vocabulary growth have been repeatedly highlighted in previous studies, students’ development of incidental vocabulary learning (IVL) in academic reading context has yet been focused. Drawing on quantitative and qualitative data from a reading experiment and follow-up interviews at an English medium university in Hong Kong, my study aims to reveal undergraduate students’ 1) IVL through reading academic texts; 2) process of inferring unfamiliar words in the texts; 3) development of IVL skills through comparing different student groups. 

Name of Supervisor
Dr Jack Pun

Fenglin Liu

Fenglin Liu

Title of thesis
Identity, Transformation, and Performance: Investigating Androgyny in Chinese Theatre Arts

Short abstract of thesis
The research explores the representation of gender identity of androgynous characters in the development of Chinese theater. Drawing on examples of transformative politics of androgyny in textual representation as well as stage direction, this research foregrounds different socio-political, aesthetic, and cultural reasons that propel such changes. A secondary aim of this research is to compare the different development and representations of androgyny in Chinese and western theatres, and to analyze the androgynous features of both theatres that helped to pave the way towards a more vocal and visible LGBTQ+ community in China.
 

Name of Supervisor
Dr Joanna Mansbridge

XIA Sichen

Sichen Xia

Title of thesis
The Dissemination of Scientific Knowledge in the Digital Era: A Multimodal Genre Analysis of TED Talk as a Popularization Genre

Short abstract of thesis
Popularization of scientific knowledge, namely, dissemination of obscure scientific knowledge among laypersons, has been extensively discussed by discourse analysts. Driven by the rapid development of Internet, online popularization, which has been playing a constructive role in spreading scientific knowledge, starts to attract researchers’ attention. However, most reviewed studies mainly focus on lexico-syntactic and structural features of popularization genres and few studies have paid attention to the multimodal features involved in popularizing science online. To fill the void, by integrating the procedural framework of genre theory with the analytical techniques provided by multimodal analysis, the current study aims to investigate how multimodal resources, altogether with textual resources (i.e. lexical, grammatical and structural resources), are manipulated in TED talk videos, to facilitate the popularization of science in the digital era. 

Name of Supervisor
Dr Christoph Hafner

Donald Yee

Donald Yee

Title of thesis
Promotion of Social Licence to Operate - A Critical Approach to Analyse Online Corporate Discourse 

Short abstract of thesis
Donald's research project aims to adopt a contemporary outlook to scrutinise corporate discourses to shed light on linguistic choices that corporations make, in order to persuade, dissuade and influence audiences to buy-in to the appropriateness of corporate actions. The discourse-analytical perspective within the research aims to help shareholders and the public at large to read the corporate text and talk in order to reveal the mechanics of corporate persuasion or dissuasion. This understanding could help validate the influences from corporate rhetoric, and so we may be in better position to challenge or reject it.

Name of Supervisor
Dr Xiaoyu Xu

Ranran Zhang

Ranran Zhang

Title of thesis
Making a Queer World: Madness, Affect and Citizenship in post World War II American Theatre

Short abstract of thesis
In postwar American theatre, a series of influential playwrights centered characters’ fantasia of affective attachment on stage, formulating a theatre of ‘madness’. Drawing upon affect theory which construes individual’s affect as corporeal intensity that could act and be acted upon, this dissertation examines ‘mad’ character’s affect and subjectivity in relation to the national sentimentality in postwar America. Under national sentimentality, individual’s personal attachment is regulated and manipulated by the government to develop an antipolitical politics and affective citizenship. Through analyzing characters’ fantasia in five plays—A Streetcar Named Desire (1947), Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1962), Funnyhouse of a Negro (1964), And Baby Made Seven (1984), and Angels in America (1991)—this dissertation attempts to explore how individual’s affect and subjectivity is shaped by and at the same time reshaping the affective discourse in postwar America.

Name of Supervisor
Dr Joanna Mansbridge